Luke


The House on the Sand

Have we disregarded the words of the Master, particularly these hard words of the Sermon on the Mount? Have we placed our concerns with doctrinal suppositions and having the right set of beliefs rather than in the radical obedience and discipleship to which the Master calls us?


Left Outside the Kingdom

We will protest that we ministered, prophesied, and performed miracles in His name: “Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in Your name, and in Your name cast out demons, and in Your name perform many miracles?” (Matthew 7:22). He will say to us, “I never knew you,” and then He will quote Psalm 6:9[8], “Depart from me, all you who do iniquity.”


Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

According to the Torah, a failed prediction disqualifies a would-be prophet: “If the thing does not come about or come true, that is the thing which the LORD has not spoken” (Deuteronomy 18:22). He is a false prophet and liable to the death penalty: “That prophet shall die” (Deuteronomy 18:20).


The Narrow Path

The Sermon on the Mount provides Yeshua's instructions for staying on the straight and narrow path to the kingdom. The Sermon on the Mount describes the righteousness that "surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees" without which "you will not enter the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 5:20).


Ask, Seek, and Knock

The “one who asks” refers to the one who asks the Father in prayer, as James the brother of the Master explained, “You do not have because you do not ask” (James 4:2). The rabbis teach, “An answer to prayer is connected to the calling, and calling is connected to the answer.”


Do Not Judge

Disciples of Yeshua should not declare God’s condemnation against others or presume to know God’s verdict regarding a human being. We should he point to a fellow’s misfortune and declare him justly repaid for wrongdoing. The disciple of Yeshua should be the most reluctant of all to declare a man’s final judgment and eternal destiny.


Don't Worry About Money

The life of John the Immerser, who lived in the wilderness eating and wearing only what he found, illustrates Yeshua’s teaching about God providing food, drink, and clothing. Discipleship to Yeshua did not allow for an abdication of responsibility, but it did call for a renunciation of worry and anxiety.


Two Masters

The slave with two masters will by way of necessity prefer one master over the other. The slave with divided loyalties cannot serve both masters simultaneously, so he must choose one over the other, even if he truly wishes he could serve both. His preference for one master will eventually evolve into disdain for the other.


Ticket to the Kingdom

Yeshua taught his disciples to expect persecution. He said, “Blessed are those who have been persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:10). By saying “theirs is the kingdom of heaven,” Yeshua indicated that those who endure persecution for his sake will find entrance into the kingdom.


Peacemakers

Yeshua said to his disciples, “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God” (Matthew 5:9). Yeshua’s beatitude about peacemakers contradicted the first-century zealot impulse that called for taking up armed resistance against Rome. Several of His disciples embraced the zealot ideal. The beatitude about peacemaking attempted to turn their thoughts away from armed revolution.